Career in Care

Been discussing about how to get people to choose care as a career. There is nationally an issue with recruitment and staff retention in Care. I feel we need to promote Care as a career choice but how to do that?

Long gone are the times when care workers did it to top up income into a home. Most carers I believe are the bread winners in the home or shared bread winners so sadly money has to be something that comes into it. I know lots will say it’s not about the money but it is if it’s your only income. Care work is still not paid to the level is should be. Yet we ask people to care for the most vulnerable people in society. I get money is not the only issue, good training/induction and feeling valued is as important. What are your thoughts on this how can we get 18 olds to choose this as a career which is what I choose actually at 16.

I was lucky enough to speak to one of my Level 5 Adult management learners yesterday and we spoke about recruitment and retention. She said she focused on getting the recruitment right she encourages them for taster days to see if they get the feel for it and she is the one as the manager who shows them. She also said her retention rate is because she promotes a positive culture within her team by empowering them to have ideas and to be part of the sucesses. I really felt she had found a way to work that will ensure her team feel valued but also knew when things weren’t going so well that she would deal immediately and ensure she reviews approaches.

Without a doubt its should be a choice to do not just because ‘IT FITS’ (I have heard this reason so many times), we need to value it as a positive career choice. I have been within care 29 years, I chose to do this as a career when planning what I wished to do at college. I knew that this was the career I wanted. There is far to much push towards Academic subjects. In general people are pushed to do care at school because they can’t do other subjects due to level but should this not be an option for all and seen the same as choosing science. There has to be away of showing care is a valued career. Health and Social care at school is an after thought its not a push as a main subject this has to change.

So please feel free to share your thoughts on care and getting people to choose as a career.
Working together to empower and value care work.
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Colour and sounds of working in care Part 2

Part 2

I could go on and on about being a care worker, which I was for 20+ years I could use lots of  language that may upset my potential customers. So, I am going to try not to swear to much but apologies if one drops in now again.

Care is still what drives me to do what I do. I hope to ensure who I meet will be great at supporting people who are classed as vulnerable and require care. We should share our experiences it’s an amazing but bloody hard job. It’s not valued as much as it should be, and it needs to be. I hear so often about poor staff retention and not being able to fill positions there has to be a reason for this and its time to do some work on finding out why.

I was a young 18-year-old when I first moved to Cambridge on my own for a job in social care. It was my ambition to work in care from when I was 14 and so I went to college for 2 years and then got my first care job in Cambridge. I remember the interview and there were quite a few candidates but was so pleased when I go the job. I moved from home on my own and started my career in care. Part one tells you about my experiences of the first day.

I loved it even though it was so time consuming. I found myself just going in and getting on with empowering the people I supported. I would ensure they knew I was there to support and enable at times with some interesting and noisy outcomes. I wouldn’t say it was all fun there were moment when I was younger where I struggled with my own ability to speak up and stand up for people.

I made a choice at 20 to have children and left the company for 5 years going back a very different person. I had grown as an individual and seemed more able to speak up and I did which meant I was able to be brave enough to speak up about a poor manager. That changed the lives of the people I was supporting in such a positive way but had a positive effect on me also.

I have had the honour of supporting people who have learning disabilities to develop and achieve independence as many levels and I value my input and the input that the people have had that I worked with over the years. I was lucky enough to work for a company that had many supported living homes on one site within a small village. we were a tight knit team and would ensure that there was full social inclusion both between the support living homes and the local community.

The growth in the people I supported is what drove me to continue and to then go onto become a Senior to deputy manager to a registered manager. I saw every level as a step to my ambition of being a manager that could make a difference. I had an amazing team of young and older people who were committed to providing a support service that was focused on people being a valued member of the community. We did that, we did somethings that were new and never achieved before. We sometimes think we can support people to the end of life, but this is not always the case, if someone reaches 65 and still in supported living at one point they would have been transferred to the ‘older persons team and potentially moved to an elderly residential home. Which was not in my opinion the best option. So, we worked hard to ensure the people we supported had a home for life. I had a great team to work with. We changed the registration and ensured we had the staffing levels and equipment to ensure we could meet the needs. So, we did it we ensure that if someone was unwell and at end of life we enabled them to stay and die in their own home.  I have to say that being with the persons family and support them was very valuable. I was able to see someone be settled with loved ones around them. I remember on person we supported and being with the family after he died and the family saying ‘mother always said he would be a tall man in death’ the person we supported had scoleosis but when he died his family found comfort in seeing him that way.  It was one of my best achievements in my career and will always stay with me.

All these journeys that we go through are as important as each other.  (think I might be waffling). As carers/trainers/managers etc we have an impact in all we do so for those days that are hard look back and remember the good ones.

So now that I am training I use all the experience I have had. All the noises and colours of living to ensure the training is interesting and honest. Training for me is about reality of life and living well with the support of people who want to enable you.

Simple.